TommyHarwood
Tommy Harwood

Tommy Harwood Reveals Latest Agricultural Production Statistics for California

Farming expert Tommy Harwood outlines the most recent agricultural production statistics and top commodities for California agriculture.

Producing more than a third of all vegetables grown in the United States, the state of California’s agricultural industry is today worth close to $50 billion annually. A farming expert and entrepreneur from Humboldt County, California, Tommy Harwood provides a professional look at the state’s most recent agricultural production statistics and top commodities, according to figures recently released by the California Department of Food and Agriculture.

“California’s farming industry now boasts over 400 commodities, producing more than one-third of the nation’s total vegetables and approximately two-thirds of our nuts and fruits each year,” reveals Tommy Harwood, a farming expert and entrepreneur, speaking from his office in Humboldt County, California.

The latest figures from the California Department of Food and Agriculture reveal that California’s farms and ranches are now in receipt of close to $50 billion annually for their output. “Representing a small increase over the previous 12 months, the most recent figures from the California Department of Food and Agriculture show how farms and ranches in California are now receiving in the region of $50 billion for their output in cash receipts yearly,” explains Tommy Harwood.

This, he says, makes California the country’s leading state for cash farm receipts. “At close to $50 billion annually, it’s an amount,” adds Harwood, “which accounts for more than 13 percent of the total agricultural value of the entire United States.”

Of the $50 billion total announced by the California Department of Food and Agriculture, by commodity, over $6.3 billion comes from dairy products, more than $6.2 billion from grapes, around $5.5 billion from almonds, and approximately $3.2 billion from cattle and calves. “Pistachios, strawberries, and lettuce, meanwhile, represent around $2.6 billion, $2.3 billion, and $1.8 billion each, respectively,” adds farming expert Tommy Harwood.

The latest California Department of Food and Agriculture agricultural production statistics refer to the 2018 crop year, according to Tommy Harwood, despite only being released recently. “The latest agricultural production statistics from the California Department of Food and Agriculture take into account the 12 months from January 2018 to December of the same year,” explains the expert, “however, the full report was only made available fairly recently, late in 2019.”

This, Tommy Harwood says, is the norm for the California Department of Food and Agriculture’s agricultural production statistics, which often take up to one year to compile in full. “Accordingly, the complete report for the 2019 California crop year,” he suggests, “including agricultural exports, will likely be released toward the end of 2020.”

“In the interim, however,” adds Tommy Harwood, wrapping up, “interested parties may query the United States Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service or refer to their National Agricultural Statistics Service for the most recent numbers.”

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Tommy Harwood and His Work with the San Francisco Rotary Club

A rotary club is an organization of people who wish to put effort into doing good to help with society’s problems, and Tommy Harwood is one of those people.

Rotary clubs are a great thing, bringing together like-minded people who wish to do service for the world in order to alleviate of it of its issues. This is obviously not possible, but they hope to make a dent regardless. One of these rotary clubs is the San Francisco Rotary club, of which Tommy Harwood is a proud member.

What Tommy Harwood has done to help the world around him

Tommy Harwood, out of concern for dwindling resources for educational services and children from underprivileged households, has made efforts to help out. For example, he donated new basketball jerseys for the Bessie Carmichael Middle School in San Francisco. He has also provided items, such as ATVs, to be given away through a raffle system hosted by the school, with the intention that the profits would go to helping the school. In general, Tommy Harwood has hosted a number of fundraisers through his business, which goes to help the small local community of Whitethorn, CA. For all of his success as an entrepreneur, he has not allowed that profit to cause him to become greedy as others with money may; quite the opposite, in fact.

He eventually began to work with the San Francisco Rotary club, continuing his pattern of philanthropic efforts. In addition to his work for schools and his community at large, he worked with this club to raise money for Bikes for Vets, which goes towards helping local veterans. He has worked with other rotary clubs as well; for example, in August 2019, Tommy Harwood worked with the SOMA Rotary, seeking to help support a San Franciscan women’s shelter, “A Woman’s Place.” These kinds of services do a great deal of help to keep vulnerable women safe if they fear for their lives from their partner or someone else.

What drives Tommy Harwood in his business ventures

Tommy Harwood makes money from his businesses, but when all is said and done, one of his largest concerns with his businesses is what it will help him put back into his local community. To Tommy Harwood, a business that does not do much for his community, or worse, ultimately creates a net loss for the community is a business that he does not want to facilitate. The last thing he wants to do is cause the people he works and lives around any strife. Not just because he does not want to get sour looks, but also because he likes the sweet looks he gets now.

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Tommy Harwood discusses Humboldt County’s sustainable cannabis farms

Local entrepreneur and farming expert Tommy Harwood offers a closer look at Humboldt County’s cannabis farms and those striving to keep them sustainable.

 

With local and state government keen to encourage responsible and less destructive methods of cannabis cultivation in Humboldt County, California, local entrepreneur and farming expert Tommy Harwood takes a closer look at ongoing efforts to keep the area’s cannabis farms sustainable. 

 

“Both local and state government continue to actively discourage irresponsible and destructive methods of cannabis cultivation,” explains Harwood, something which, he says, was commonplace under prohibition. From managing pollution to minimizing soil erosion, county and state regulations have—while encouraging responsible and less destructive methods of cannabis cultivation—also had an effect on the sustainability of the industry, according to the farming expert. 

 

While Harwood says it’s vital that Humboldt County’s natural resources are protected, it’s also important to support sustainability. “It’s about promoting environmentally friendly but sustainable ways to grow cannabis,” suggests the local farming expert. “Thankfully,” he continues, “many of Humboldt County’s cannabis farmers are now committed to shrinking their farms’ environmental footprints.”

 

Many are doing so with the help of environmental consultants and other experts, according to Tommy Harwood. Many of these experts, he says, are also striving to help keep cannabis farming operations sustainable.

 

In response to damaging runoff and pollution caused in the past by Humboldt County’s cannabis growers, regulations now state that any property in the region with more than 2,000 square feet of cannabis must register plans to undertake only responsible and less destructive methods of cultivation. Harwood himself has enrolled in the scheme and registered plans of his own. “It’s about being proactive and progressive,” suggests the local entrepreneur, “which is also a great feel-good thing, too.”

 

What’s important now, says Harwood, is ensuring that a proactive and progressive approach to cannabis cultivation also remains sustainable for growers. 

 

“It’s a fine balancing act,” adds the entrepreneur, wrapping up, “but protecting Humboldt County’s natural resources is vital, so we must continue to work with environmental consultants and other experts to help keep local cannabis farming operations sustainable at the same time.”

 

Entrepreneur and farming expert Tommy Harwood, a resident of Whitethorn, California, moved to southern Humboldt County in 1996. Determined to create a successful business opportunity both for himself and those around him, today Harwood supports the local economy and employs over 25 members of the nearby small and tightly knit community of Redway. Another of Harwood’s business ventures also provides hiring, accounting, licensing, marketing, and other business management services to a wide range of clients both in Humboldt County and further afield.

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Tommy Harwood considers new framework for agricultural supply chain risk management

Farming expert Tommy Harwood considers a new decision-making framework for supply chain risk management in agriculture.

 

Designed to support supply chain risk management within a circular economy, a new decision-making framework has recently been proposed by experts in agriculture. An entrepreneur and farming expert from Humboldt County, California, Tommy Harwood considers this multi-criteria decision-making framework, tailored toward those working in a circular economy context. 

 

“Using management science-based tools, a new multi-criteria-based methodology has been proposed to address so-called circular economies in agriculture around the world,” explains Harwood. This methodology, he says, primarily assesses the risk of flooding in existing crop areas.

 

“A principal objective of several governments seeking sustainable development, circular economy strategies deal with the production of commodities in agriculture,” Harwood continues. The result, according to the farming expert, is, it’s hoped, vastly reduced carbon emissions, and the avoidance of unnecessary waste, among other benefits.

 

A new multi-criteria decision-making framework may, then, says Harwood, be wholly capable of supporting a more, or yet more, circular economy in agriculture across the board. “It’s also hoped,” he adds, “that such a framework may, in the event of flooding in existing crop areas, help to prevent collapses in food supply and production.” 

 

This would be achieved by identifying flood risk drivers and the subsequent effects on agriculture supply chain sustainability, chiefly in relation to circular economy strategies, according to Harwood. A so-called step-wise weight assessment ratio analysis would, he goes on to reveal, when combined with a multi-criteria decision approach, allow for this, it’s believed. 

 

“What would follow would be an evaluation of collected data to rank agricultural projects in terms of the mitigation of flood risks, and the impact of flooding on existing crop areas,” adds farming expert Tommy Harwood. 

 

The proposed new decision-making framework for supply chain risk management in agriculture is supported by a research project overseen by the European Commission Scientific Section, and uses a case example from Spain. 

 

Based on recent reporting, it’s already been found that such a decision-making framework and multi-criteria methodology is effective in ranking flood risk mitigation and the impact of flooding on established crop areas.

 

“It’s hoped, therefore, that the agricultural industry, particularly within a circular economy, can utilize this decision-making framework and multi-criteria methodology,” adds Harwood, wrapping up, “to more accurately identify flood risk drivers, and to better determine the best ways in which to mitigate the impact of flooding in areas already used to grow crops.”

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Tommy Harwood Considers How 5G Could Revolutionize Agriculture and Farming

California-based entrepreneur and farming expert Tommy Harwood explains how 5G technology looks set to revolutionize the agricultural industry.

 

With 5G technology fast on the approach for many, and already here for some, the next generation of the internet looks set to revolutionize all manner of aspects of modern life. A farming expert from Whitethorn, California, entrepreneur Tommy Harwood considers how the new technology could, in particular, change the face of agriculture, both in the U.S. and worldwide, forever.

 

“For many of us, 5G technology is almost here,” says Harwood, owner and founder of Redway Feed, Garden & Pet Supply, based in Humboldt County, California, “and, for some, including those living in more than 30 U.S. cities currently, 5G connectivity has already arrived.”  

 

The so-called next generation of the internet, he suggests, looks almost certain to change the face of farming and agriculture, both in America and around the world, forever. “From internet-connected tractors and real-time soil monitoring, to, for example, remote veterinarian care, the opportunities afforded by 5G could transform the industry in its entirety,” adds Harwood. 

 

Far faster and more dependable than current 4G, it’s important to remember, farming expert and entrepreneur Tommy Harwood says, that new, 5G technology is about more than just smartphones, music streaming, and mobile internet more generally. “Way, way beyond entertainment, with its incredibly low latency and higher-than-ever reliability, 5G is so robust that it’ll likely begin, and quickly, to replace traditional wired connections,” he explains. It’ll also see more traditional pieces of equipment and machinery—such as tractors, for example—quickly brought online, the expert says. “Smart tractors!” Harwood remarks. 

 

Internet-connected sensors for monitoring and artificial intelligence-powered equipment, also facilitated heavily by 5G, will see farmers better positioned than ever to keep a check on everything from the weather and soil nutrient levels to livestock wellness and more, according to Harwood, whether they’re physically on the farm or not. “While such technology already exists to a degree, it’s often hindered by poor dependability and slow connection speeds – something which 5G will hopefully resolve almost overnight,” he adds. 

 

Indeed, 5G promises five times the speed of the most commonly used current internet connection options straight out of the box. Yet, according to semiconductor and telecommunications equipment company Qualcomm, it’ll be as many as 15 years before the full economic effect of 5G is realized globally. “In the U.S. and many other countries, however, we’ll likely see significant economic effect much, much sooner,” suggests Harwood

 

“There’s no doubt in my mind that the future of farming is coming,” he adds, wrapping up, “and, I believe, it’ll be heavily influenced and powered by the next generation of the internet – 5G.”

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Tommy Harwood explores booming organic food market

Farming expert and entrepreneur Tommy Harwood delves into the organic food trend and considers the market’s impact on the environment.

The trend for organic food both in the U.S. and elsewhere around the world continues, with sales up more than 50 percent in recent years alone. Soaring demand, however, has led to questions surrounding sustainability and environmental impact. A farming expert and entrepreneur from Whitethorn, California, Tommy Harwood takes a closer look at the matter.

“Since 2013, sales of organic food have increased by more than 50 percent,” reveals Harwood, owner and founder of Redway Feed, Garden & Pet Supply, Crop King, and business management services firm Good Elements, Inc.

Figures from the Organic Trade Association show that between 2013 and 2018, organic food sales increased by almost 53 percent to a total of nearly $48 billion.

With organic farming free of the harmful chemicals associated with traditional large scale agriculture, it’s widely seen as beneficial to the environment, according to Harwood. Farming in general, though, he says, still contributes significantly toward rising greenhouse gas emissions.

“In the U.S., farming overall accounts for approximately 9 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions,” Harwood explains. “Around half of this comes from nitrous oxide contained within soil, and caused by fertilizer use,” he adds.

Unlike traditional farming, however, organic production entails practices such as crop rotation and the use of so-called cover crops to promote healthy soil. “This,” Tommy Harwood adds, “helps to prevent erosion and, as a result, keeps greenhouse gas emissions to a minimum as healthy soil releases much lower levels of nitrous oxide.”

“At the same time,” he continues, “organic practices such as tilling can have the opposite effect, whereas using chemicals, instead, for weed suppression does not directly cause elevated nitrous oxide emissions in itself.”

Tommy Harwood suggests that it’s a fine balance, but believes the benefits of organic farming largely outweigh the few negatives.

“Reduced overall environmental impact,” he adds, wrapping up, “coupled with tastier, healthier produce, often produced more locally than traditionally farmed goods, explain why, among other reasons, the organic food market continues to see such a boom in sales.”

Entrepreneur and farming expert Tommy Harwood, a resident of Whitethorn, California, moved to southern Humboldt County in 1996. Determined to create a successful business opportunity both for himself and the community, in 2007, Harwood established Southern Humboldt Farm, Feed & Ag Supply, Inc., now known as Redway Feed, Garden & Pet Supply. Today, the company supports the local economy and employs over 25 members of the small and tightly knit Redway community. Harwood’s other business ventures, meanwhile, include Crop King-a garden supply retailer-and Good Elements, Inc., which provides hiring, accounting, marketing, licensing, and other business management services to a wide range of clients both in Humboldt County and further afield.

 

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Tommy Harwood Examines California’s Scheduled Ban on Widely Used Pesticide

Farming expert Tommy Harwood delves into the state of California’s upcoming ban on the widely used pesticide known as chlorpyrifos

Widely used in farming across California, under a new agreement reached between the state and manufacturers of the pesticide, sales of chlorpyrifos will cease early in 2020. With links now made between chlorpyrifos and serious health problems-including brain damage-in children, farming expert Tommy Harwood offers a closer look at the ban, set to come into place during the first week of February next year.

“Effective as of February 6, 2020, chlorpyrifos will be banned in the state of California,” explains Harwood, a farming expert and entrepreneur based in southern Humboldt County.

Citing links between the popular and widely used pesticide and serious health problems, chlorpyrifos was declared a restricted material in 2015. “Since then, chlorpyrifos has required a county permit to use,” reveals Harwood, “with California responsible for using as much as a quarter of all chlorpyrifos employed in the U.S.”

Last year, however, the pesticide was further declared a toxic air contaminant, according to the farming expert. “In light of this, chlorpyrifos will now be banned in the state of California,” Harwood adds.

Chlorpyrifos is used across California to control pests on crops such as almonds, citrus, grapes, walnuts, cotton, and alfalfa. Despite the efficacy of the chemical, significant links have been made between chlorpyrifos and serious health problems in children, including brain damage. Accordingly, New York and Hawaii, too, are both in the process of banning the pesticide.

The California ban on chlorpyrifos has been heralded as ‘a big win’ by environmental justice advocates and Governor Gavin Newsom alike. “For years, environmental justice advocates have fought to get the harmful pesticide chlorpyrifos out of our communities,” said Governor Newsom in a statement. “Thanks to their tenacity and the work of countless others,” he continues, “this will now occur faster than originally envisioned.”

“This is a big win,” adds the Governor, “for children, workers, and public health in California.”

The ban forms part of an agreement between pesticide manufacturers and California’s pesticide regulation department. “Following the ban which comes into place in February, California has promised a total of more than $5.5 million in grants,” adds farming expert Tommy Harwood, wrapping up, “to assist pesticide manufacturers in developing one or more safer alternatives to chlorpyrifos for use in the future.”

Entrepreneur Tommy Harwood, of Whitethorn, California, is the founder of Southern Humboldt Farm, Feed and Ag Supply, Inc., now known as Redway Feed, Garden & Pet Supply. Harwood is deeply invested in community outreach programs in the census-designated area of Redwood and across much of southern Humboldt County, where he now both lives and works. Alongside Redway Feed, Garden & Pet Supply, Harwood’s other business ventures include garden supply retailer Crop King, and business management services firm Good Elements, Inc.

Tommy Harwood reveals how urban agriculture is contributing to food security

Entrepreneur Tommy Harwood, founder of Redway Feed, Garden & Pet Supply, explains the growing importance of urban agriculture.

Providing access to affordable and healthy food for individuals and families at risk of food insecurity, urban agriculture is today playing a significant part in contributing to society both in the United States and elsewhere around the world, according to Tommy Harwood. A farming expert and entrepreneur based in southern Humboldt County, Harwood reveals more about urban agriculture’s role in supporting food security among those most vulnerable.

“In recent years, urban agriculture has begun to play a major role in preventing food insecurity by bolstering supplies of affordable, healthy, and accessible food for those most at risk,” reveals Harwood, a resident of Whitethorn, California, and founder of Redway Feed, Garden & Pet Supply. Both in the United States and overseas, urban agriculture is today supporting, in particular, he says, those most vulnerable to food insecurity, especially in and around more major towns and cities.

“As urban areas continue to expand in size, and as populations both here in the U.S. and elsewhere around the world continue to grow and grow, urban agriculture is now more important than ever,” suggests Harwood.

“Particularly here in the United States, our ever-growing major towns and cities are becoming increasingly expensive places to live,” explains the farming expert. The same, however, is also true in many other nations, from the most to the least developed countries, according to Harwood. “The result of this,” the entrepreneur continues, “is, ultimately, greater food prices and higher-than-ever levels of food wastage, both of which are contributing massively to the growing issue of food insecurity.”

Tommy Harwood believes that many of the world’s major, contemporary cities, as well as larger towns and extended metropolitan areas, must work to establish sustainable solutions to food insecurity as a matter of utmost urgency. One such solution, he says, is urban agriculture. “Investment into urban agriculture and education surrounding urban agricultural practices are becoming increasingly important as the so-called ‘urban sprawl’ of our towns and cities continues to spread,” adds the expert.

Population growth, expanding urban areas, and increasing poverty levels in many regions mean that something must change, according to Harwood, if a greater risk of food insecurity is to be avoided. Urban agriculture, he says, is, however, already combating the issue, at least to a degree, in many areas where the practice has been implemented on a meaningful scale.

“Supported by the necessary local investment and the appropriate education, urban agriculture, I believe,” Tommy Harwood adds, wrapping up, “is among the most viable and important solutions to combating the growing problem of food insecurity, and is something in which we must all invest both our time and effort if we’re to continue to address the matter on a truly meaningful scale moving forward.”

Entrepreneur Tommy Harwood, of Whitethorn, California, is the founder of Southern Humboldt Farm, Feed and Ag Supply, Inc., now known as Redway Feed, Garden & Pet Supply. Harwood is deeply invested in community outreach programs in the census-designated area of Redwood and across much of southern Humboldt County, where he now both lives and works. Alongside Redway Feed, Garden & Pet Supply, Harwood’s other business ventures include garden supply retailer Crop King, and business management services firm Good Elements, Inc.